2017 - 2018 Calendar

  • FIRST QUARTER
  • Registration and Orientation
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • August 21 – October 25, 2017
  • August 21, 2017
  • August 22 – October 20, 2017
  • September 18 – 22, 2017
  • October 23 – 25, 2017
  • SECOND QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week & Thanksgiving
  • Research & Holidays
  • Final Exams
  • October 30, 2017 – January 17, 2018
  • October 30, 2017 – January 12, 2018
  • November 20 – 24, 2017
  • December 21, 2017 – January 03, 2018
  • January 15 – 17, 2018
  • THIRD QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • January 23 – March 28, 2018
  • January 23 – March 23, 2018
  • February 19 – 23, 2018
  • March 26 – 28, 2018
  • Fourth QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • April 02 – June 06, 2018
  • April 02 – June 01, 2018
  • April 30 – May 04, 2018
  • June 04 – 06, 2018

2016 - 2017 Calendar

  • FIRST QUARTER
  • Registration and Orientation
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • August 22 - October 26, 2016
  • August 22, 2016
  • August 23 - October 21, 2016
  • September 19 - 23, 2016
  • October 24 - 26, 2016
  • SECOND QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week & Thanksgiving
  • Research & Holidays
  • Final Exams
  • October 31, 2016 - January 18, 2017
  • October 31, 2016 - January 13, 2017
  • November 21 - 25, 2016
  • December 22, 2016 - January 04, 2017
  • January 16 - 18, 2017
  • THIRD QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • January 23 - March 29, 2017
  • January 23 - March 24, 2017
  • February 20 - 24, 2017
  • March 27 - 29, 2017
  • Fourth QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • April 03 - June 07, 2017
  • April 03 - June 02, 2017
  • May 01 - 05, 2017
  • June 05 - 07, 2017

2015 - 2016 Calendar

  • FIRST QUARTER
  • Registration and Orientation
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • August 17 – October 21, 2015
  • August 17, 2015
  • August 17 – October 23, 2015
  • September 14 – 18, 2015
  • October 19 – 21, 2015
  • SECOND QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week & Thanksgiving
  • Research & Holidays
  • Final Exams
  • October 26, 2015 – January 13, 2016
  • October 26, 2015 – January 08, 2016
  • November 23 – 27, 2015
  • December 21, 2015 – January 01, 2016
  • January 11 – 13, 2016
  • THIRD QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • January 18 – March 23, 2016
  • January 18 – March 18, 2016
  • February 15 – 19, 2016
  • March 21 – 23, 2016
  • Fourth QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • March 28 – June 01, 2016
  • March 28 – May 27, 2016
  • April 24 – 29, 2016
  • May 30 – June 01, 2016

2014 - 2015 Calendar

  • FIRST QUARTER
  • Registration and Orientation
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • August 18 - October 22, 2014
  • August 18, 2014
  • August 18 - October 17, 2014
  • September 22 - 26, 2014
  • October 20 - 22, 2014
  • SECOND QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week & Thanksgiving
  • Research & Holidays
  • Final Exams
  • October 27, 2014 - January 14, 2015
  • October 27, 2014 - January 09, 2015
  • November 24 - 28, 2014
  • December 22, 2014 - January 02, 2015
  • January 12 - 14, 2015
  • THIRD QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • January 19 - March 25, 2015
  • January 19 - March 20, 2015
  • February 16 - 20, 2015
  • March 23 - 25, 2015
  • Fourth QUARTER
  • Classes
  • Research Week
  • Final Exams
  • March 30 - June 03, 2015
  • March 30 - May 29, 2015
  • April 27 - May 01, 2015
  • June 01 - 03, 2015

Catalog

PURPOSE

The Bible Institute of Missouri has been established for the purpose of training men to be proclaimers of God's Word throughout the United States and the world. The school recognizes the need for training institutions that are affordable to those who may not have the means to attend a college or university. Also, the great need for faithful gospel preachers in the brotherhood has brought about the establishment of the Bible Institute of Missouri. Another great purpose of this school is to provide extension courses to help take care of the need for more teaching and training in the Lord's church. The Bible Institute of Missouri is open to all who desire to gain further Bible knowledge and/or to become full-time gospel preachers. The school will make every effort to maintain the highest standard in teachers, students and academics.

(Return to the Top of Page)

ACADEMIC STANDING

The Bible Institute of Missouri offers the equivalent or 139 semester hours in Bible and related subjects, it must be remembered that the Bible Institute of Missouri is operated by and for churches of Christ. Outside agencies conferring academic status or recognition are of little value to such schools because they lack a proper appreciation for the aims and purposes of preacher training schools. The two-year program is equivalent to that of a four-year college program. The school is conducted on a college level of instruction.

The school does have a graduation service and awards a "Degree of Biblical Studies" to those who successfully complete the work. Graduates of the Bible Institute of Missouri will be respected for their abilities and preparation, and will be the equal of any worker for the Lord in the world.

(Return to the Top of Page)

CLASS ATTENDANCE

Each student is expected to be in his respective class on time at every session as scheduled. All necessary tardies and absences must be arranged with the director and respective instructors and are to be governed by the following:

Leave of Absence. Such is granted to students under conditions that are beyond their control, such as road hazards, weather conditions, sickness, death in the immediate family, necessary official business and representing the school.

Absences and Class Cuts. No absence is permitted, except as indicated in the above paragraph. No class cuts are excused. Each case will be reviewed by the director and faculty committee. Anyone whose attendance is determined unsatisfactory will be dismissed. Appointments with doctors and dentists should be made for after school or on Saturdays.

Tardies. Being late to chapel and classes will not be tolerated. Three tardies equal one unexcused absence; three unexcused absences subject one to dismissal. Anyone habitually tardy for classes at anytime (at the beginning of class or after break) is to be refused admittance to class and readmitted only after permission from the director is granted.

For each unexcused absence, the student's final grade average will be reduced five points. A written reason for each tardy or absence must be presented to the instructor. Unsatisfactory attendance will be reported to the director.

Make-up work. Each student is held accountable for work missed due to absence for any reason and will be required to make it up, according to the demands of his respective instructor. In view of the intensive work and accelerated program of this school, any student missing as much as two weeks total in any one session may be asked to withdraw. He may re-enter in a later term.

(Return to the Top of Page)

STUDENT LOAD

All students are required to take a full load of six courses each quarter plus two summer courses. During the regular school year, two courses meet for three hours each week, and four courses meet for six hours each week. Students who begin school at the same time will cover the same material and graduate together.

(Return to the Top of Page)

GRADING SYSTEM

  • 98-100
  • 93-97
  • 90-92
  • 88-89
  • 83-87
  • 80-82
  • 78-79
  • 73-77
  • 70-72
  • 68-69
  • 63-67
  • 60-62
  • 0-59
  • Incomplete
  • A+
  • A Excellent
  • A-
  • B+
  • B Above Average
  • B-
  • C+
  • C Average Passing
  • C-
  • D+
  • D Below Average
  • D-
  • F Not Passing
  • I
  • 4.00 Quality points per term
  • 3.74 Quality points per term
  • 3.50 Quality points per term
  • 3.25 Quality points per term
  • 3.00 Quality points per term
  • 2.75 Quality points per term
  • 2.50 Quality points per term
  • 2.00 Quality points per term
  • 1.75 Quality points per term
  • 1.50 Quality points per term
  • 1.00 Quality points per term
  • 0.75 Quality points per term
  • 0.00 Quality points per term
  • 0.00 Quality points per term

A student who has an "incomplete" must complete the requirements for that course within six weeks during the next term or his grade will become an "F." An "F" may be removed by repeating the course or fulfilling special work requirements assigned by the instructor and approved by the director. All students will be counseled, concerning this matter, when it seems necessary.

(Return to the Top of Page)

SCHOLASTIC PROBATION

Any student making below a "C-minus" average (1.75 Quality Points) for any term will be placed on probation throughout the following term. He must remove that probation within the next term or be asked to withdraw the following term. Those thus suspended may be readmitted after the lapse of one term, subject to approval of the director and faculty. No student can graduate from the Bible Institute of Missouri with an "F" or an "I" on his record. Permanent records will be kept by the school.

(Return to the Top of Page)

PROGRESS REPORTS

In addition to papers returned, a grade report card will be given to each student at the end of each quarter. On demand, progress reports will also be given to those who provide support directly to the student.

(Return to the Top of Page)

RULES OF CONDUCT

  • All students are expected to assume proper responsibility as citizens. Any who are convicted of any law violation will be subject to discipline by the school.
  • Everyone is expected to deal honestly and uprightly with fellow students and with congregations and individuals who supply financial support.
  • Any words or actions unbecoming to Christians will not be tolerated. At all times the student must conduct himself with proper decorum and must display proper attitudes in all matters pertaining to his school work.
  • Students in this school are not permitted to use tobacco, illegal drugs, and/or alcohol in any form, and any who are found doing so will immediately be dismissed.
  • Though a specific offense may not be committed, a student may be asked to withdraw at any time if his attitude and demeanor are not in harmony with the spirit and purpose of the school. This will not be subject to review by any other person or group outside the Bible Institute of Missouri.
  • Students must attend all the public worship services of the congregation where the school is located, unless he is working with another congregation of the Lord's church is some capacity.
  • Business deals of any kind relative to borrowing and lending with fellow students and/or with faculty are strongly discouraged. Living within one's means is a virtue for every man and especially so with those who would preach. If scholarship funds are insufficient to meet a students needs, this should be discussed with the director before enrolling. Any student involved in any business deal that the administration deems improper will be dismissed.
  • Other rules will be distributed at registration.

(Return to the Top of Page)

DRESS AND CLEANLINESS

  • When attending classes the student is required to wear a collared shirt during school hours, 8:00 to 4:00 p.m.
  • Tight fitting jeans, shorts or other such pants are forbidden.
  • All students are requested to dress at worship as if they were going to class. A coat and tie are required if preaching.
  • Long hair or thick/shaggy sideburns are not permitted. Any facial hair should be kept well groomed. The judgement of the school will determine what is or is not acceptable in all matters of facial hair.
  • Body piercing of any kind is not permitted.

(Return to the Top of Page)

TUITION AND FEES

There will be no charge for tuition or fees. All cost of administration and instruction are borne by the faculty through those churches who support them in their work. In addition some funds may be provided by churches for the support of the student's living expenses while in preparation.

(Return to the Top of Page)

TEXTBOOKS AND MATERIALS

Textbooks are made available to students by the school. These textbooks may be purchased by students upon graduation. Materials needed by each student such as paper, pencils, and notebooks must be purchased by each student out of his scholarship or personal funds.

(Return to the Top of Page)

CREDITS

Each full-time student must attend classes a total of thirty hours a week on a regular schedule plus chapel. During the regular school year, there will be four ten-week sessions totaling forty weeks per year plus the summer term. On a "clock-hour" basis, during the two years of intensive study, each student will receive over 2,000 hours of instruction. On the basis of three hours per week for a normal credit hour, this equals a total of 139 semester hours.

(Return to the Top of Page)

CLOCK HOUR CREDIT

Chapel begins at 8:00 A.M., and classes meet six hours per day, 8:40 A.M. to 11:40 A.M. and from 1:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. five days each week making a total of thirty-two and a half hours of instruction per week.

(Return to the Top of Page)

SCHOOL SESSIONS

Each school year is divided into four terms of ten weeks each. Included in each term is a week designated for research. The tenth week is used for final exams. In addition, there is a summer term of five weeks.

(Return to the Top of Page)

DAILY CHAPEL SERVICES

Daily chapel services are conducted throughout the entire school year. This period of daily devotion consist of songs, scripture readings, prayers, and messages delivered by students, guest speakers, and faculty. Chapel begins daily at precisely 8:00 AM, and attendance is required of all students.

(Return to the Top of Page)

FINANCIAL SUPPORT AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Students should make every effort to provide their own support before entering school. Family, Christian friends, and local churches should be appealed to for support covering at least twenty months of study at the Bible Institute of Missouri. Students who can provide some or all of their own support are expected to do so.

For prospective students who cannot provide all of the funds needed to enter and remain in school, a limited number of scholarships are available. Scholarships vary in amount, depending on what the student can provide and whether the student is married or single.

(Return to the Top of Page)

PREVIOUS CREDIT

Credit for previous education and training will be given to students transferring to this school, after being evaluated. Such transfer students will be placed at the level to which they have obtained.

(Return to the Top of Page)

COST OF LIVING

The cost of living in Springfield is about the average for most smaller Midwest cities. An unmarried student can live and buy necessary items for living for around $500 to $700 per month. A family of four would need somewhere between $1250 to $1750 per month for living needs. This would be the minimum amount needed.

(Return to the Top of Page)

HOUSING

All students are responsible for arranging for their own living quarters. The school will assist with contacts. Unfurnished apartments and houses start from $350 per month. Two bedroom houses can be found beginning at $400 per month, and three bedroom houses can be found for $500 per month.

(Return to the Top of Page)

STUDENT SUPPORT

Students are responsible for raising their own support. This can come by selling property or using savings accounts. Some mortgage their holdings, while others borrow money to supplement their support. Wives can also work. Some receive help from relatives and friends. Most students receive support from one or more congregations. Many congregations are willing to help support students in training to become gospel preachers. Begin at your home congregation and tell the elders or men that you want to train to be a preacher. Explain your needs and your desires to preach. Ask us for assistance, and we will help you find prospects and even help you contact some prospects. 

(Return to the Top of Page)

EMPLOYMENT FOR WIVES

The job market is good in Springfield. There will be many opportunities for employment for wives who need to work.

(Return to the Top of Page)

PREACHING OPPORTUNITIES

There are many churches in and around the Springfield area that can use part-time preachers. We are hoping to be able to give every student an opportunity to preach at least twice every month in the area.

(Return to the Top of Page)

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

A limited number of cash scholarships are provided from a special school fund. Students must give proper evidence of this need and worthiness to qualify. From this special fund, assistance is also given in case of an emergency. This fund is provided by contributions from churches and interested individuals. Those who lack sufficient funds may make application for some assistance.

(Return to the Top of Page)

CLASSES FOR WIVES

Classes for wives will be provided. Wives will be required to attend unless there are unusual circumstances, if at all possible.

(Return to the Top of Page)

INSURANCE

If possible, students should arrange to have some kind of insurance in the event of illness or other emergencies. The school is not able to assume financial responsibility for any student.

(Return to the Top of Page)

Schedule of Courses at the Bible Institute of Missouri

A Schedule
(Begins Even Years)

B Schedule
(Begins Odd Years)

FIRST YEAR - FRESHMAN COURSES

-First Quarter-

111 Old Testament and New Testament Survey (3) (60)
112 Bible Geography (3) (60)
116C Life of Christ 1 (3) (60)
117C Genesis (3) (60)
113 English Grammar 1 (1) (30)
115 The Preacher and His Work 1 (1) (30)
111 Old Testament and New Testament Survey (3) (60)
112 Bible Geography (3) (60)
118C John (3) (60)
119C Hebrew History 1 (3) (60)
113 English Grammar 1 (1) (30)
115 The Preacher and His Work 1 (1) (30)

-Second Quarter-

121 New Testament Church (3) (60)
122 Prison Epistles (3) (60)
126C Life of Christ 2 (3) (60)
127C Exodus and Leviticus (3) (60)
123 English 2 (1) (30)
125 The Preacher and His Work 2 (1) (30)
121 New Testament Church (3) (60)
122 Prison Epistles (3) (60)
128C Acts (3) (60)
129C Hebrew History 2 (3) (60)
123 English 2 (1) (30)
125 The Preacher and His Work 2 (1) (30)

FIRST YEAR - SOPHOMORE COURSES

-Third Quarter-

211 Denominational Doctrines (3) (60)
212 Hermeneutics (3) (60)
216C Corinthians (3) (60)
217C Numbers and Deuteronomy (3) (60)
213 English 3 (1) (30)
215 The Preacher and His Work 3 (1) (30)
211 Denominational Doctrines (3) (60)
212 Hermeneutics (3) (60)
218C Church History (3) (60)
219C Wisdom Literature 1 (3) (60)
213 English 3 (1) (30)
215 The Preacher and His Work 3 (1) (30)

-Fourth Quarter-

221 General Epistles (3) (60)
222 Apologetics (3) (60)
226C World Religions (3) (60)
227C Jeremiah and Lamentations (3) (60)
223 English 4 (1) (30)
225 The Preacher and His Work 4 (1) (30) (Fishers of Men)
221 General Epistles (3) (60)
222 Apologetics (3) (60)
228C Timothy and Titus (3) (60)
229C Wisdom Literature 2 (3) (60)
223 English 4 (1) (30)
225 The Preacher and His Work 4 (1) (30) (Fishers of Men)

-Summer Courses-

S01 Introduction to Counseling (3) (50)

SECOND YEAR - JUNIOR COURSES

-First Quarter-

311 General Biblical Introduction (3) (60)
312 Minor Prophets (3) (60)
118C John (3) (60)
119C Hebrew History 1 (3) (60)
314 New Testament Greek 1 (1) (30)
315 The Preacher and His Work 5 (1) (30)
311 General Biblical Introduction (3) (60)
312 Minor Prophets (3) (60)
116C Life of Christ 1 (3) (60)
117C Genesis (3) (60)
314 New Testament Greek 1 (1) (30)
315 The Preacher and His Work 5 (1) (30)

-Second Quarter-

321 Thessalonians and Hebrews (3) (60)
322 Isaiah (3) (60)
128C Acts (3) (60)
129C Hebrew History 2 (3) (60)
324 New Testament Greek 2 (1) (30)
325 The Preacher and His Work 6 (1) (30)
321 Thessalonians and Hebrews (3) (60)
322 Isaiah (3) (60)
126C Life of Christ 2 (3) (60)
127C Exodus and Leviticus (3) (60)
324 New Testament Greek 2 (1) (30)
325 The Preacher and His Work 6 (1) (30)

SECOND YEAR - SENIOR COURSES

-Third Quarter-

411 Romans and Galatians (3) (60)
412 Ezekiel and Daniel (3) (60)
218C Church History (3) (60)
219C Wisdom Literature 1 (3) (60)
414 New Testament Greek 3 (1) (30)
415 The Preacher and His Work 7 (1) (30)
411 Romans and Galatians (3) (60)
412 Ezekiel and Daniel (3) (60)
216C Corinthians (3) (60)
217C Numbers and Deuteronomy (3) (60)
414 New Testament Greek 3 (1) (30)
415 The Preacher and His Work 7 (1) (30)

-Fourth Quarter-

421 Revelation (3) (60)
422 The Godhead (3) (60)
228C Timothy and Titus (3) (60)
229C Wisdom Literature 2 (3) (60)
424 New Testament Greek 4 (1) (30)
425 The Preacher and His Work 8 (1) (30)
421 Revelation (3) (60)
422 The Godhead (3) (60)
226C World Religions (3) (60)
227C Jeremiah and Lamentations (3) (60)
424 New Testament Greek 4 (1) (30)
425 The Preacher and His Work 8 (1) (30)

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Each course is designated by numbers. Courses in the 100 group are classed as freshman; 200 as sophomore; 300 as junior; and 400 as senior. Classes ending in "C" are combined courses. All classes whose numbers end with 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, or 9 meet sixty hours per term, or the equivalent of a twenty week semester, three hours a week, plus. Courses ending with 3, 4, or 5 run the entire school year, and equal six semester hours.

Each quarter, students have a quarter course load of fifteen hours. Upon graduation each student will have the equivalent of 139 semester hours of credit. In the course schedule, the semester hour equivalent is given in the first parentheses; the second parentheses represents the actual hours taken in the course.

BIBLICAL FIELD - OLD TESTAMENT

117C Genesis

In view of the value of the Pentateuch in contributing to an understanding of the New Testament, it is studied thoroughly. Special emphasis is given to the creation, the beginning of the unfolding of the Scheme of Redemption, and the promises and providence of God.

127C Exodus and Leviticus

This is a continuation of the study of the Pentateuch. Attention will also be given to the mission of Moses, the plagues, Passover, Exodus, the journey to Sinai, the Decalogue, the Tabernacle, and other subjects.

217C Numbers, and Deuteronomy

This, too, is a continuation of the study of the Pentateuch. Numbers affords a study of the wanderings of Israel from Sinai to the Promised Land. In Deuteronomy, further emphasis will be given to the binding of the Decalogue, especially the Sabbath, as to whom it applied. Some criticism of Deuteronomy will be considered, showing, beyond doubt it was a production inspired by God and written by Moses. Special Emphasis is to be made in the study of "types".

119C Hebrew History I (Joshua - 1st Samuel)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the rise and fall of Israel, the social and religious customs of that day, and the influence of prophets and kings. Parallels between the history of Israel and that of the church will be noted.

129C Hebrew History II (2nd Samuel - Esther)

A continuation of 223.

219C Wisdom Literature 1 (Job, Proverbs, Song of Solomon)

In Job, the problem of human suffering is analyzed. Valuable internal evidences of inspiration are observed. Proverbs sets forth words of wisdom far above human philosophy, while the demands for purity of life will be noted in Solomon's Song.

229C Wisdom Literature 2 (Psalms and Ecclesiastes)

The Psalms will be analyzed for insight into the love and mercy of God, and how better to praise Him. Messianic prophecies will be noted. In Ecclesiastes, attention is given to the true meaning of life.

322 Isaiah

Attention is given to problems of criticism, conditions of the nations, warnings and threats, prophecies of captivity and return, and Messianic prophecies.

227C Jeremiah and Lamentations

Attention is given to the courage and concern of this great man of God. Warnings to Judah and prophecies of captivity and return are noted, along with New Testament connections.

412 Ezekiel, and Daniel

The responsibility of both the preacher and the people are emphasized. Attention will be given to the symbolism of Ezekiel and prophecies of restoration. In Daniel, conditions in captivity are noted, with special attention to prophecies of the coming kingdom.

312 Minor Prophets (Hosea through Malachi)

A study of the last twelve books of the Old Testament provides an additional index of God's dealings with the nation. The messages of the prophets is compared with Messianic prophecies and the value of these books in practical preaching for today.

BIBLICAL FIELD - NEW TESTAMENT

116C Life of Christ I

The life and ministry of Christ are introduced. Biographical and didactical phases of these books are emphasized. The Synoptic Problem will be considered.

126C Life of Christ II

This course is a continuation and completion of 113.

118C The Book of John

The thesis of John is "Jesus Christ, the Son of God." The pre-fleshly state of Christ is considered. Evidence of the deity of Christ is emphasized, as set forth in the "miracles, signs, and wonders."

128C Acts of Apostles

A study is made of the establishment and spread of the early church. Each case of conversion will be thoroughly analyzed. The historical setting of Acts also provides background for the epistles.

411 Romans and Galatians

An analysis of Romans , as well as other New Testament epistles, shows salvation is by grace through faith in contrast to the works of the Mosaic system; yet at the same time, Romans clearly shows grace does not annul the conditions of salvation. This is of special importance. Galatians deals further with the Law and God's promise.

216C Corinthians

Many problems plague the Corinthian church. This study investigates the means and methods prescribed by the Holy Spirit to correct unfavorable conditions and solve the problems. The practical lessons are of great help for today. It also deals with a defense of Paul's apostleship and sundry matters that deal with faithfulness to Christ.

122 Prison Epistles (Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon)

Ephesians gives a summary of God's eternal purpose in the church, which is exalted and glorified as the body of Christ. Philippians contains valuable instructions to the church. Colossians deals with false doctrine and gives instruction to Christians. Philemon deals with certain social attitudes.

321 Thessalonians and Hebrews

Thessalonians deals with the doctrine of final things. The book of Hebrews glorifies Christ and seeks to prevent apostasy of Hebrew Christians. Distinguishing features between the Law of Moses and the gospel are observed, and emphasis is given to practical aspects needed for Christians today.

228C Timothy and Titus

Studies in Timothy and Titus serve to further emphasize character and responsibilities of evangelists.

221 General Epistles (James, Peter, John and Jude)

The book of James presents Christian principles designed to aid the readers to overcome sins prevalent then and now and furnishes a cure for the ills of humanity. Peter sets forth instructions as to how to remain steadfast, confirming faith in the gospel. The second epistle involves dangers of apostasy and exhortations in view of the end of time. First, Second, and Third John give evidence essential to faith, refute various "isms", and encourage faithfulness to Christ and His doctrines. Jude deals with various moral and spiritual issues which yet need emphasis, as well as warning against false teachers.

421 Revelation

The practical values of the book are emphasized; various methods of interpretation are given; and the victory of the church is considered.

121 New Testament Church

In view of the misunderstandings of the church as revealed in the New Testament, and in view of the fact that many today would advocate a "restructuring" of the church, this study is of great importance. The study will be conducted topically. Special attention will be given to such matters as name, organization, government, essentiality, oneness, distinctiveness, fellowship, membership, discipline, Old Testament prophecies, destiny, mission, and worship.

422 The Godhead

This course examines all three persons of the Godhead with special emphasis and careful consideration on the nature, mission and work of the Holy Spirit are given. This is especially important in view of those who are making claims of the miraculous gifts such as tongue speaking.

THE HISTORICAL FIELD

111 Old Testament and New Testament Survey

Each book of the Bible is reviewed briefly to display its place in the complete revelation of God to man. It is intended to provide students with an overview of the complete revealed will of God.

112 Bible Geography

A highly valuable course in historical geography of the Bible. The origin and spread of the nations are traced. Important Biblical events are connected with places to give reality to Biblical accounts. This course provides excellent foundation for general Biblical knowledge.

218C Church History

This course summarizes church history, beginning with Imperial Rome, the establishment of the church and development of apostasy through the Protestant Reformation. Included is a brief introduction to the Restoration Movement in America.

THE PRACTICAL FIELD

115 The Preacher and His Work

This course has eight divisions and meets three hours per week for two years. The courses are numbered: 115, 125, 215, 225, 315, 325, 415, and 425. Sermon design, outlining, and delivery are studied. Considerable opportunities to deliver sermons in class are also provided. Speeches appropriate for funerals and weddings are studied and practiced. Practical aspects of the preacher's life and work are also studied such as character, work, personal library, visitation, and various problems that are likely to be encountered. A study of evangelism using "Fishers of Men" materials is offered.

113 English Grammar 1

English grammar is considered a necessary tool in preaching from the English translations. The English sentence is studied in all its parts. The eight parts of speech are studied in detail. Attention is given to sentence structure, phrasing, and diagramming. In all sections of grammar, efforts are made to expand the student's vocabulary.

123 English Grammar 2

This course is a continuation of 115.

213 English Grammar 3

Attention is given to rules of punctuation, capitalization, and mechanics of composition. Practical exercises in written compositions of various types are begun.

223 English Grammar 4

This course is a continuation of 215. Compositions are prepared and criticized. While overseen by an instructor, each student prepares a composition project for publication in a religious journal in America.

222 Apologetics

This course considers arguments for the existence of God, inspiration of the Bible, the deity of Christ, and other similar issues which must be combated in today's society.

222 Hermeneutics

This course deals with the science of interpretation, especially the figurative language found in the Bible. It is of great value in showing how to better study the Bible.

S01 Introduction to Counseling

In this course, students are introduced to some of the fundamentals of counseling. Unlike many counseling courses, this study will consider counseling from a biblical perspective.

311 General Biblical Introduction

This course is a study of inspiration, canonicity, genuineness and authenticity of the Scriptures. Attention will be given to how the Bible came into existence, including a discussion of various versions.

314, 324 New Testament Greek

The first two quarters will be devoted to alphabet, vocabulary, syntax, forms and preparation to translate.

414, 424 New Testament Greek

The second half of the school year will be devoted to translating from the writings of John and other selections. Further study of materials introduced in the first two quarters will also be conducted.

211 Denominational Doctrines

Examined in the light of Biblical truth, this is a study of major religious bodies and their beliefs, both past and present.

226C World Religions

Like Denominational Doctrines, this course will examine major world religions, their beliefs, and their practices in light of Biblical truth.

Monday - Wednesday - Friday

  • 8:00 A.M. - 8:50 A.M.
  • 8:50 A.M. - 9:00 A.M.
  • 9:00 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.
  • 9:30 A.M. - 9:50 A.M.
  • 9:50 A.M. - 10:40 A.M.
  • 10:40 A.M. - 10:50 A.M.
  • 10:50 A.M. - 11:40 A.M.
  • 11:40 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
  • 1:00 P.M. - 1:50 P.M.
  • 1:50 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
  • 2:00 P.M. - 2:50 P.M.
  • 2:50 P.M. - 3:10 P.M.
  • 3:10 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
  • Class
  • Break
  • Chapel
  • Break
  • Class
  • Break
  • Class
  • Lunch
  • Class
  • Break
  • Class
  • Break
  • Class

Tuesday - Thursday

  • 8:00 A.M. - 9:15 A.M.
  • 9:15 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.
  • 9:30 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.
  • 10:00 A.M. - 10:25 A.M.
  • 10:25 A.M. - 11:40 A.M.
  • 11:40 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
  • 1:00 P.M. - 1:50 P.M.
  • 1:50 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
  • 2:00 P.M. - 2:50 P.M.
  • 2:50 P.M. - 3:10 P.M.
  • 3:10 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
  • Class
  • Break
  • Chapel
  • Break
  • Class
  • Lunch
  • Class
  • Break
  • Class
  • Break
  • Class

Objectives of the Bible Institute of Missouri

  • To honor God's Word as the verbally inspired Word of God, perfect and complete, without contradiction or error.

  • To uphold the need for accepting the Word of God as the final authority in all matters of faith and practice.

  • To provide a well-rounded program of Bible instruction designed to fully equip men to proclaim God's message to the whole world.

  • To strive for the highest quality in teacher and student.

  • To provide quality instruction for men who desire to serve in the Kingdom as gospel preachers.

  • To avoid extremism and radicalism.

  • To emphasize the necessity of maintaining the spirit of Christ in the Lord's work.

  • To encourage the evangelism of the world by offering advanced training in missions.

  • To provide extension classes, seminars, and workshops for leadership training in local churches.

Requirements for Graduation

  • The student must have demonstrated a proper godly character.

  • Each student must complete satisfactorily all the prescribed courses. There are no electives in the curriculum.

  • An overall average of 2.0 (C) must be maintained.

  • Any student having an "F" or "I" on his record must remove such before graduation.

  • Each student must have completed over 2,000 clock hours of classroom study, instruction, or whatever may be required by the instructor.